2019 DRI Annual Conference
Nov
7
9:00 AM09:00

2019 DRI Annual Conference

From Local to Global: The External Validity Challenge of Experiments

Event Overview:

In recent decades, the use of experimental and quasi-experimental methods has become widespread across a range of fields in economics, such as labor, education, health, and especially development. The emphasis on experimental and quasi-experimental methods was driven by an attempt to generate internally valid results, i.e., accurate estimates of the impact of the policy of interest in the time and place the experiment was implemented. But the now global scale of experiments points to the central question of external validity: to what extent and how can we generalize the knowledge generated by experiments beyond the setting of the experiment to other contexts?

Speakers:

  • Susan Athey, Stanford University

  • Sylvain Chassang, New York University

  • Rajeev Dehejia, New York University

  • Michael Kremer, Harvard University

  • Rohini Pande, Yale University

  • Cyrus Samii, New York University

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Book Launch: Good Economics For Hard Times by Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo
Nov
25
6:00 PM18:00

Book Launch: Good Economics For Hard Times by Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo

  • NYU Silver Center for Arts and Sciences; Hemmerdinger Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Event Program:

5:30PM - 6:00PM: Doors Open, Guest Arrival
6:00PM - 6:05PM: NYU Development Research Institute Welcome Remarks by Rajeev Dehejia
6:05PM - 6:45PM: A Conversation between Esther Duflo and Debraj Ray
6:45PM - 7:15PM: Q&A
7:15PM - 8:00PM: Reception and Book Signing

About the Author:

Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is the co-author of ‘Good Economics for Hard Times’ with Abhijit V. Banerjee.

Overview:

Figuring out how to deal with today's critical economic problems is perhaps the great challenge of our time. Much greater than space travel or perhaps even the next revolutionary medical breakthrough, what is at stake is the whole idea of the good life as we have known it. Immigration and inequality, globalization and technological disruption, slowing growth and accelerating climate change—these are sources of great anxiety across the world, from New Delhi and Dakar to Paris and Washington, DC. 

In the past, we’ve turned to economists to solve these large-scale problems, but over the past few decades—and certainly since the 2008 financial crisis—the global citizenry have lost their faith in economists. Yet the resources to address these challenges are there, but what we lack are ideas that will help us jump the wall of disagreement and distrust that divides us. 

In this event, Esther Duflo will introduce "Good Economics for Hard Times", a new book co-authored with Abhijit Banerjee, where they draw on the best recent economics to demonstrate how to think about these problems differently, and present intelligent, daring solutions based on sound research into real-life situations , towards a society built on compassion and respect. 

Book Reviews:

“Not all economists wear ties and think like bankers. In their wonderfully refreshing book, Banerjee and Duflo delve into impressive areas of new research questioning conventional views about issues ranging from trade to top income taxation and mobility, and offer their own powerful vision of how we can grapple with them.  A must-read.”

- Thomas Piketty, professor, Paris School of Economics, and author of Capital in the Twenty-first Century

“In Good Economics for Hard Times, Banerjee and Duflo, two of the world’s great economists, parse through what economists have to say about today’s most difficult challenges – immigration, job losses from automation and trade, inequality, tribalism and prejudice, and climate change. The writing is witty and irreverent, always informative but never dull. Banerjee and Duflo are the teachers you always wished for but never had, and this book is an essential guide for the great policy debates of our times.”

- Raghuram Rajan, Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, and author of The Third Pillar and Fault Lines

“A magnificent achievement, and the perfect book for our time. Banerjee and Duflo brilliantly illuminate the largest issues of the day, including immigration, trade, climate change, and inequality. If you read one policy book this year -- heck, this decade - read this one.”

- Cass R. Sunstein, Robert Walmsley University Professor, Harvard University, and author, How Change Happens

“One of the things that makes economics interesting and difficult is the need to balance the neat generalities of theory against the enormous variety of deviations from standard assumptions: lags, rigidities, simple inattention, society’s irrepressible tendency to alter what are sometimes thought of as bedrock characteristics of economic behavior. Banerjee and Duflo are masters of this terrain. They have digested hundreds of lab experiments, field experiments, statistical studies and common observation to find regularities and irregularities that shape important patterns of economic behavior and need to be taken into account when we think about central issues of policy analysis.  They do this with simple logic and plain English. Their book is as stimulating as it gets.”

- Robert Solow, Nobel prize winner and Emeritus Professor of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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DRI/Africa House Fireside Chat with Amb. Fatima Kyari Mohammed, Permanent Observer of the African Union to the United Nations
May
2
4:00 PM16:00

DRI/Africa House Fireside Chat with Amb. Fatima Kyari Mohammed, Permanent Observer of the African Union to the United Nations

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Thursday, May 2, 2019

4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

14A Washington Mews

New York, NY 10003

RSVP HERE

Space is limited and will be on a first come basis.
Reception to follow at Africa House.

Join Africa House Director/DRI Co-Director, Professor Yaw Nyarko, as he moderates a fireside chat with Amb. Fatima Kyari Mohammed, the Permanent Observer of the African Union (AU) to the United Nations (UN). 

Amb. Fatima Kyari Mohammed is the Permanent Observer of the African Union (AU) to the United Nations (UN). Her mandate is to represent the AU at the UN as well as develop and maintain constructive and productive relationship between the AU and Member States in New York. Prior to her appointment, she was Senior Special Advisor to the ECOWAS Commission. Her career spans over 2 decades with a focus on peace, security, socio-economic development, regional integration, organizational development, and project management, both in the public and private sectors.

Her academic background is in Peace, Security, Development and Conflict Transformation (University of Innsbruck), Responsible Management and Sustainable Economic Development (UN University for Peace, Costa Rica), and Business Communication (European University, Switzerland). She also has a BA in Environmental Design (ABU, Zaria, Nigeria).

She is also the Founder of the LikeMinds Project, a non-profit, Organisation working with vulnerable communities in Nigeria. She is an Eisenhower Fellow, and was further honored with the ExxonMobil Distinguished Fellow Award in 2017.


Event Co-Hosts:

Founded in 2006, the NYU Development Research Institute (DRI) is home to a growing team of researchers and students. Through our work, we seek to expand the number and diversity of serious commentators on the state of foreign aid and development. Our ultimate goal is to have a positive impact on the lives of the poor, who deserve the benefit of high-quality, clear-eyed, hard-headed economic research applied to the problems of world poverty.

www.nyudri.org

NYU Africa House is an interdisciplinary institute devoted to the study of contemporary Africa, focusing on economic, political, and social issues on the continent and programs in the Arts. An integral part of Africa House’s core mission is the advancement of the understanding of the links between Africa and the rest of the world within social, historical, and economic contexts, among others. To this end, we have fostered relationships with African immigrant communities in New York City. NYU has a large number of professors and students doing research in the areas of economic development, macroeconomics and economic growth, microfinance, politics, political economy, law, and legal institutions. Africa House regularly convenes high level talks and seminars, and has in the past featured African heads of state. We also host policy luncheons, and research discussion presentations on focused topics. Our programs take place in New York City and in various cities in Africa.

www.nyuafricahouse.org

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Book Launch: Order without Design: How Markets Shape Cities, By Alain Bertaud
Dec
11
5:30 PM17:30

Book Launch: Order without Design: How Markets Shape Cities, By Alain Bertaud

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Tuesday, December 11 
5:30pm
New York University
14A Washington Mews, New York, NY 10003

Event Program:

5:30pm – Brief welcome from the Marron Institute

5:35pm – Introductory commentary by William Easterly

5:50pm – Fireside discussion between Alain Bertaud and Weiping Wu of Columbia GSAPP

6:35pm – Audience Q&A

6:50pm – Book signing

RSVP HERE

 

Overview:

Join us on Tuesday, December 11 at 5:30pm for the launch of Alain Bertaud’s new book from MIT Press, Order without Design: How Markets Shape Cities. In it, Bertaud argues that operational urban planning can be improved by the application of the tools of urban economics to the design of regulations and infrastructure. Drawing on five decades of urban planning experience in forty cities around the world, Bertaud links cities’ productivity to the size of their labor markets; argues that the design of infrastructure and markets can complement each other; examines the spatial distribution of land prices and densities; stresses the importance of mobility and affordability; and critiques the land use regulations in a number of cities that aim at redesigning existing cities instead of just trying to alleviate clear negative externalities. Bertaud concludes by describing the new role that joint teams of urban planners and economists could play to improve the way cities are managed.

Event Program:

Professor William Easterly, Co-Director of NYU’s Development Research Institute, will provide an opening commentary on the book. Bertaud will then sit down for a discussion of the book with Weiping Wu, Professor of Urban Planning and Director of the M.S. in Urban Planning program at Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, before fielding questions from the audience. Books will be available for sale and signature.

Speakers:

Alain Bertaud is Senior Research Scholar at New York University’s Marron Institute of Urban Management. He has worked as Principal Urban Planner for the World Bank and as an independent consultant and resident urban planner in cities ranging from Bangkok to New York.

William Easterly is Professor of Economics at New York University and Co-director of the NYU Development Research Institute. His most recent book is entitled The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the
Forgotten Rights of the Poor
. He is a Research Associate of NBER and has served as Co-Editor of the Journal of Development Economics.

Weiping Wu is Professor of Urban Planning at Columbia GSAPP and Director of the M.S. Urban Planning program. Trained in architecture and urban planning, Prof. Wu has focused her research and teaching on understanding urban dynamics in developing countries in general and China in particular.

This event is co-hosted by NYU’s Marron Institute of Urban Management, NYU’s Development Research Institute, NYU Africa House, and NYU’s Urban Planning Student Association.

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Angus Deaton in Conversation with Amartya Sen, "Economics with a Moral Compass? Welfare Economics: Past, Present, and Future"
Nov
17
2:00 PM14:00

Angus Deaton in Conversation with Amartya Sen, "Economics with a Moral Compass? Welfare Economics: Past, Present, and Future"

  • Kimmel Center, Rosenthal Pavilion (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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©Goldman: Courtesy of NYU Photo Bureau


Event Program:

1:30pm – 2:00pm             Doors Open, Guest Arrival

2:00pm – 2:05pm            Welcome Remarks on Behalf of New York University
By: C. Cybele Raver, NYU Deputy Provost

2:05pm – 4:00pm            Angus Deaton in Conversation with Amartya Sen

4:00pm – 5:00pm            Networking Reception

RSVP HERE

Speakers:

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Sir Angus Deaton is Senior Scholar and the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs Emeritus at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School where he taught for thirty years. He is also Presidential Professor of Economics at the University of Southern California. He is the author of five books including, most recently, The Great Escape: health, wealth, and the origins of inequality. His interests include health, development, poverty, inequality, and wellbeing. He has written extensively on happiness, on foreign aid, and on how we should collect evidence for good policy. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Philosophical Society, and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. He was President of the American Economic Association in 2009, and in 2015 he received the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel “for his analysis of consumption, poverty, and welfare.” He was born in Edinburgh in Scotland and is a British and an American citizen; his BA, MA, and PhD are from Cambridge University. He was made a Knight Bachelor for his services to economics and international affairs in the Queen’s Birthday Honors List in 2016.

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Amartya Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor, and Professor of Economics and Philosophy, at Harvard University and was until 2004 the Master of Trinity College, Cambridge.  He is also Senior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows.  Earlier on he was Professor of Economics at Jadavpur University Calcutta, the Delhi School of Economics, and the London School of Economics, and Drummond Professor of Political Economy at Oxford University.

Amartya Sen has served as President of the Econometric Society, the American Economic Association, the Indian Economic Association, and the International Economic Association.  His research has ranged over social choice theory, economic theory, ethics and political philosophy, welfare economics, theory of measurement, decision theory, development economics, public health, and gender studies.  Amartya Sen’s books have been translated into more than thirty languages, and include Choice of Techniques (1960), Growth Economics (1970), Collective Choice and Social Welfare (1970), Choice, Welfare and Measurement (1982),  Commodities and Capabilities (1987), The Standard of Living (1987), Development as Freedom (1999), Identity and Violence: The Illusion of Destiny (2006), The Idea of Justice (2009), and (jointly with Jean Dreze) An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions (2013), and The Country of First Boys (2015). 

Amartya Sen’s awards include Bharat Ratna (India); Commandeur de la Legion d'Honneur (France); the National Humanities Medal (USA); Ordem do Merito Cientifico (Brazil); Honorary Companion of Honour (UK); Aztec Eagle (Mexico); Edinburgh Medal (UK); the George Marshall Award (USA); the Eisenhower Medal (USA); and the Nobel Prize in Economics.

Conversation Chair:

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Sir Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics and Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). From September 2006 to August 2009, he served as an external member of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee and since 2015 has been a member of the UK’s National Infrastructure Commission. He is also a Senior Fellow in the Institutions, Organizations and Growth Program of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR). Professor Besley was educated at Aylesbury Grammar School and Oxford University where he became a prize fellow of All Souls College. He taught subsequently at Princeton before being appointed Professor in the economics department at the LSE in 1995. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society, the British Academy, and the European Economic Association. Currently, he is an Editorial Committee Member of the Annual Review of Economics. He is also a foreign honorary member of the American Economic Association and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as President of the International Economic Association and of the European Economic Association. He is currently serving as the President of the Econometric Society. Professor Besley is a past co-editor of the American Economic Review, and a 2005 winner of the Yrjö Jahnsson Award of the European Economics Association.  His research, which mostly has a policy focus, is in Development Economics, Public Economics and Political Economy. In 2018, he was made a Knight Bachelor for services to Economics and Public Policy.

Event Co-Hosts:

The Annual Review of Economics covers significant developments in the field of economics, including macroeconomics and money; microeconomics, including economic psychology; international economics; public finance; health economics; education; economic growth and technological change; economic development; social economics, including culture, institutions, social interaction, and networks; game theory, political economy, and social choice; and more.

www.annualreviews.org/journal/economics

Founded in 2006, the NYU Development Research Institute (DRI) is home to a growing team of researchers and students. Through our work, we seek to expand the number and diversity of serious commentators on the state of foreign aid and development. Our ultimate goal is to have a positive impact on the lives of the poor, who deserve the benefit of high-quality, clear-eyed, hard-headed economic research applied to the problems of world poverty.

www.nyudri.org

The C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics has as its major objective the fostering and development of rigorous applied work in the economic sciences, accomplished through a commitment to providing research support and creating forums for intellectual exchange. The C.V. Starr Center, housed within the Department of Economics at New York University, provides direct financial support for research faculty as well as for doctoral students involved in applied research activities. The Center regularly sponsors academic conferences, hosts renowned visiting scholars, and schedules plenary lectures given to a broad academic audience on topics of special significance to contemporary economic policy and application.

www.cvstarrnyu.org

Supported by:

NYU Office of the Provost

NYU Conversations in the Social Sciences

NYU Africa House

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2018 DRI Annual Conference: "Economics and Culture"
Oct
11
9:00 AM09:00

2018 DRI Annual Conference: "Economics and Culture"

  • Kimmel Center, Rosenthal Pavilion (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

©Goldman: Courtesy of NYU Photo Bureau

Event Overview:

There has been increasing interest over the last decade in understanding the role of culture in shaping development outcomes. The push has come from many directions: from studying economic history, from the institutions and growth literature, from political economy, and more recently from a literature that has explicitly tried to measure dimensions of culture and their evolution and their impact on economic interactions and on the process of development. Culture, defined loosely as shared ideas, customs, and social behavior, is from the perspective of economics a deeply endogenous variable, in other words, something that is determined through a history of economic, social, and political interaction. At the same time, once a culture forms, it acquires its own valence, shaping the way individuals interact, transact, and aggregate into a process of growth.

Conference Program:

MCs: Rajeev Dehejia, (New York University) and Yaw Nyarko, (New York University)

8:00am–9:00am Registration, coffee and pastries

9:00am–9:05am DRI welcome remarks by Rajeev Dehejia, (New York University)

9:05am-9:10am Introductory remarks by Yanoula Athanassakis, Associate Vice Provost, Academic Affairs and Special Projects; Director, Environmental Humanities Initiative, (New York University)

9:10am–9:50am Nathan Nunn, (Harvard University). "The Importance of Culture and Context for Development Policy"

9:50am–10:30am Enrico Spolaore, (Tufts University). “Modern Fertility"

10:30am–10:45am Break with coffee and pastries

10:45am–11:25am William Easterly, (New York University). "Does Ethnicity Predict Culture?"

11:25am–12:05pm Raquel Fernandez, (New York University). "Cultural Change”

12:05pm–12:45pm Alberto Bisin, (New York University). "The Joint Dynamics of Culture and Institutions"

12:45pm–1:45pm Lunch for audience and speakers

1:45pm–2:25pm Gerard Roland, (University of California, Berkeley). "The Deep Historical Roots of Modern Culture”

Speaker Bios:

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Nathan Nunn is Frederic E. Abbe Professor of Economics at Harvard University. Professor Nunn’s primary research interests are in economic development, cultural economics, political economy, economic history, and international trade. He is an NBER Faculty Research Fellow, a Research Fellow at BREAD, and a Faculty Associate at Harvard's Weatherhead Center for International Affairs (WCFIA). He is currently a co-editor of the Journal of Development Economics. View Slides Here

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Enrico Spolaore is the Seth Merrin Chair and Professor of Economics at Tufts University, and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). His research is in the areas of political economy, growth and development, and cultural economics. His publications include articles in economics journals (American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economic Studies, Review of Economics and Statistics, etc.), the book The Size of Nations (with Alberto Alesina, MIT Press), and two edited volumes on Culture and Economic Growth (Edward Elgar). Spolaore received an undergraduate degree (Laurea) in Economics and Commerce from the University of Rome, a doctoral degree (Dottorato di Ricerca) from the University of Siena, and a Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University. He lives in Lexington (MA) with his wife Deborah and their golden retriever Alfred. View Slides Here

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William Easterly is Professor of Economics at New York University and Co-director of the NYU Development Research Institute, which won the 2009 BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge in Development Cooperation Award. He is the author of three books: The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor (March 2014), The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good (2006), which won the FA Hayek Award from the Manhattan Institute, and The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists’ Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (2001).

He has published more than 60 peer-reviewed academic articles, and has written columns and reviews for the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, New York Review of Books, and Washington Post. He has served as Co-Editor of the Journal of Development Economics and as Director of the blog Aid Watch. He is a Research Associate of NBER, and senior fellow at BREAD. Foreign Policy Magazine named him among the Top 100 Global Public Intellectuals in 2008 and 2009, and Thomson Reuters listed him as one of Highly Cited Researchers of 2014. He is also the 11th most famous native of Bowling Green, Ohio. View Slides Here

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Raquel Fernandez is a Professor in the Department of Economics at New York University. She is also a member of Equality, Social Organization, and Performance at the University of Oslo, the National Bureau of Economic Research, the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), and Institute for Labor Economics. She has previously been a tenured professor at the London School of Economics and Boston University and held visiting positions at various institutions around the world. She has served as the Director of the Public Policy Program of the CEPR and is currently a Co-Director of the Inequality group at the NBER. She has been a Panel Member of the National Science Foundation and a Program Committee Member of the Social Science Research Council, and has served as a Co-Editor of the Journal of International Economics, a Co-Editor of Economic Development and Cultural Change, an Associate Editor of the Review of Economic Dynamics, and is currently an Associate Editor of the Journal of Economic Literature. Currently she is Vice President of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association and in the past served as Vice President of the AEA. She is the recipient of several National Science Foundation grants, of a Spencer Fellowship from the National Academy of Education, and was awarded a National Fellow at the Hoover Institute and a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. She is a fellow of the Econometric Society and of BREAD. Her most recent research is primarily in the areas of culture and economics, development and gender issues, inequality, and political economy.

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Alberto Bisin is Professor of Economics at New York University. He is an elected fellow of the Econometric Society. He is also fellow of the NBER, CESS at NYU, and the CEPR. He is Associate Editor of the Journal of Comparative Economics Economic Theory and of Research in Economics. He is the co-organizer of the annual NBER Meeting on Culture and Institutions. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, obtained in 1994. His main academic contributions are in the fields of Social Economics, Financial Economics, and Behavioral Economics. He has published widely in economics journals. He co-edited the Handbook of Social Economics and is in the process of co-editing the Handbook of Historical Economics. Finally, he is founding editor of noiseFromAmerika.org and contributes op-eds for the italian newspaper La Repubblica. View Slides Here

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Gérard Roland is the E. Morris Cox Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science at the University of California Berkeley where he has been since 2001. He has received many honors including an honorary professorship from the Renmin University of China in Beijing in 2002. He is the author of over 150 journal articles, chapters in books, and books and has been published in leading economics journals. He wrote the leading graduate textbook “Transition and Economics” published in 2000 at MIT Press and translated in various languages, including Chinese and Russian. He co-organized with Olivier Blanchard a Nobel symposium on the transition economics in 1999. In recent years, his research has broadened to developing economies in general with special emphasis on the role of institutions and culture. He wrote a new undergraduate textbook on Economics of development (2013, Pearson Addison-Wesley). View Slides Here

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Professor Benno J. Ndulu Talk - “Pathways for African Shared Prosperity in the New Technological Reality”
Jul
25
4:30 PM16:30

Professor Benno J. Ndulu Talk - “Pathways for African Shared Prosperity in the New Technological Reality”

Abstract:

The last two decades have seen a large number of African countries post rapid growth by the region’s historical experience. In contrast to the past, the region managed to ride through three shocks with reasonable resilience - the global financial crisis, the Euro crisis, and, more recently, commodity price shocks - with some variation across countries. About 100 million Africans were lifted out of poverty and some improvements in life expectancy were registered. In contrast to the Asian emerging economies, however, this progress was made without significant structural transformation or creation of modern jobs. The advent of artificial intelligence and data technologies have made industrialization increasingly jobless as robots "take over." Has the region missed on the opportunity to get on the escalator that helped Asian economies catch up and reduce poverty very significantly? What alternative escalators for structural transformation, catching up income-wise, and poverty reduction are available to the region? How should the region position itself to take advantage of disruptive technologies to make progress toward prosperity? The presentation will offer some ideas in response to these questions.

Speaker Bio:

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Professor Benno J. Ndulu just completed a 10-year term as Governor of the Bank of Tanzania, the country's Central Bank, and is now the Mwalimu Nyerere Professorial Chair on Development at the University of Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. He is best known for having served as one of the pioneers for the most effective research and training network in economics in Africa, the African Economic Research Consortium, where he served first as its research Director and then as its Executive Director. Having begun his career in academia at the University of Dar-es Salaam, he later served in the World Bank as a Research Manager in Development Economics (DEC) and Advisor to Vice President Africa Region. He has published widely on growth, governance, and trade. He is currently co-directing the Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development anchored at Blavatnik School of Government.

Download Presentations Slides Here.

Pictures From Prof. Ndulu's Talk:

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Anne Case Talk - “Death in the Afternoon: Changing Mortality Patterns in Working Class America”
Apr
16
12:30 PM12:30

Anne Case Talk - “Death in the Afternoon: Changing Mortality Patterns in Working Class America”

Abstract:

This lecture builds on and extends the findings in Case and Deaton (2015, 2017) on increases in mortality and morbidity among white non-Hispanic Americans in midlife since the turn of the century. Increases in all-cause mortality continued to 2016, led by increases in drug overdose, suicide, and alcohol-related liver mortality, most notably among those with less than a bachelor degree. Not only are educational differences in mortality among whites increasing, but from 1998 to 2015 mortality rose for those without, and fell for those with, a college degree. Mortality rates in comparable rich countries have continued their pre-millennial fall at the rates that used to characterize the US. Why has the US left the herd? We propose a story of cumulative disadvantage from one birth cohort to the next, in the labor market, in marriage arrangements, and in health, that has been triggered by progressively worsening labor market opportunities at the time of entry for whites with less education. We examine mechanisms at work in the US that have made for an increasingly hostile labor market for working class workers, and policy levers that, if pulled, may help strengthen the market for less well educated Americans.

Speaker Bio:

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Anne Case is the Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Emeritus and Lecturer with Rank of Professor at Princeton University, where she is the Director of the Research Program in Development Studies. Dr. Case has written extensively on health over the life course. She has been awarded the Kenneth J. Arrow Prize in Health Economics from the International Health Economics Association, for her work on the links between economic status and health status in childhood, and the Cozzarelli Prize from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences for her research on midlife morbidity and mortality. Dr. Case currently serves on the Advisory Council for the NIH-National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the President's Committee on the National Medal of Science, and the Committee on National Statistics. She is a Research Associate of the NBER, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and is an affiliate of the Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit at the University of Cape Town. She also is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society.

 

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Ross Levine Talk - "In Defense of Wall Street"
Mar
28
4:30 PM16:30

Ross Levine Talk - "In Defense of Wall Street"

Abstract:

Many agree with the second President of the United States: “... banks have done more harm to the morality, tranquility, and even wealth of this nation than they have done or ever will do good.” This certainly accords with the tenets of the Hollywood blockbusters, The Wolf of Wall Street and Wall Street. In this talk, I take a step back from the rhetoric and ask (a) what does the evidence say about the role of the financial system in shaping economic growth, poverty, income inequality, and discrimination and (b) what types of financial policy reforms will foster economic prosperity.  

Speaker Bio:

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Ross Levine is the Willis H. Booth Chair in Banking and Finance at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Milken Institute, a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a member of the Scientific Advisory Council of the European Systemic Risk Board. He completed his undergraduate studies at Cornell University in 1982 and received his Ph.D. in economics from UCLA in 1987.  He worked at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the World Bank, where he conducted and managed research and operational programs. His work focuses on how financial sector policies and the operation of financial systems shape economic growth, entrepreneurship, and economic prosperity. His two most recent books, Rethinking Bank Regulation: Till Angels Govern and Guardians of Finance: Making Regulators Work for Us, stress that regulatory policies often stymie competition and encourage excessive risk-taking, with deleterious effects on living standards. Levine advises governments, central banks, regulatory agencies, and multilateral organizations. Read more.

Download Presentation Slides Here.

Watch Presentation Video Below:

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Lant Pritchett Talk – “The Debate about RCTs in Development is over. We won. They lost.”
Feb
21
4:30 PM16:30

Lant Pritchett Talk – “The Debate about RCTs in Development is over. We won. They lost.”

Abstract:

There has been a debate in development economics over the last 20 years as some claimed the use of RCTs as a tool for independent impact evaluation would significantly improve development practice and hence development.  While right about the methodological claims about the superiority of randomization to produce cleaner estimates of the LATE (local average treatment effect) of projects and programs, this, in and of itself, does not change development practice.  All of the five claims needed to sustain a positive model in which RCT/IIE has a major positive impact are demonstrably false.  The proponents of RCTs have responded to losing the first round decisively by changing significantly both their claims and their practice.

Speaker Bio:

Lant Pritchett is a Professor of the Practice of International Development at the Harvard Kennedy School.  He will be moving in 2018 to Oxford’s Blavatnik School of Government where he is working on a large research project on how to improve systems of basic education in developing countries. Read more here.

Download Presentation Slides Here. 

 


Watch Event Presentation Below: 

 

 

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Success Without Design: Lessons from the Unplanned World of Development
Apr
6
4:00 PM16:00

Success Without Design: Lessons from the Unplanned World of Development

How can we plan to make development happen in a world where most success is unplanned? Does respecting the rights of the poor make unplanned development work better?

To find out join us for an NYU Development Research Institute event on April 6, 2016, featuring a conversation between Matt Ridley, author of  The Evolution of Everything: How New Ideas Emerge and William Easterly, author of The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators, and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor.

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Development Faculty Discussion
Dec
18
7:00 PM19:00

Development Faculty Discussion

DRI hosts a regular development faculty discussion series. Our motivation is to increase communication among faculty working on development at NYU. We are inviting a group of faculty that includes not only those with a development focus, but also those whose research has contributed directly or indirectly to the development literature.

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Development Faculty Discussion
Nov
20
6:30 PM18:30

Development Faculty Discussion

DRI hosts a regular development faculty discussion series. Our motivation is to increase communication among faculty working on development at NYU. We are inviting a group of faculty that includes not only those with a development focus, but also those whose research has contributed directly or indirectly to the development literature.

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Development Faculty Discussion
Oct
30
6:30 PM18:30

Development Faculty Discussion

DRI hosts a regular development faculty discussion series. Our motivation is to increase communication among faculty working on development at NYU. We are inviting a group of faculty that includes not only those with a development focus, but also those whose research has contributed directly or indirectly to the development literature.

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Development Faculty Discussion
Sep
25
6:30 PM18:30

Development Faculty Discussion

DRI hosts a regular development faculty discussion series. Our motivation is to increase communication among faculty working on development at NYU. We are inviting a group of faculty that includes not only those with a development focus, but also those whose research has contributed directly or indirectly to the development literature.

View Event →